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See detailLEARN stellt sech fier
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (3 UL)
See detailA developmental investigation of the SNARC effect using a colour discrimination task.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Presentation (2012, July 17)

How do number-space interactions develop from childhood to adulthood? The SNARC effect (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) reflects the finding that participants respond faster to small ... [more ▼]

How do number-space interactions develop from childhood to adulthood? The SNARC effect (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) reflects the finding that participants respond faster to small numbers with their left hand and to large numbers with their right hand during a number classification task. Typically assessed through magnitude-independent parity judgment tasks, the SNARC effect is thought to show the automaticity of the number-space link. Using a parity task on children Berch et al. (1999) found a SNARC effect no earlier than from 9.2 years onwards. However, we hypothesise that parity judgments might be inappropriate to assess younger children. Therefore a more age-apropriate colour judgment task (implicit) and a magnitude judgement task (explicit) were designed and tested on 363 children from kindergarten to Grade 6 (5.8-12 years). The experimental tasks were complemented by a brief assessment of arithmetic skills. The results revealed overall significant SNARC effects [colour task t(355)=2.6, p<0.01; magnitude task t(340)=4.7, p<0.001], which interacted with grade [colour task F(6,355)=2.18; p<0.05; magnitude task F(6,340)=2.09; p=0.05]. Most interestingly, even the kindergartners already display both effects [colour task t(28)=1.96; p<0.05; magnitude task t(24)=1.7; p=0.05]. These results show explicit and implicit access to numerical magnitude in children as young as 5.8 years. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: Electrophysiological evidence from a target discrimination task
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2012, February 10)

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects ... [more ▼]

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects as event-related potentials (ERPs) at centro-parietal sites. Since both studies used target detection tasks, it remains currently unknown whether similar results would be obtained with a discrimination task. We used ERPs to test whether digit cues also induce attention shifts when participants perform a feature-discrimination task on targets. ERPs were recorded whereas subjects discriminated the colour of lateral targets that were preceded by a central non-predictive digit. Analysis of cue-locked controlateral vs. ipsilateral ERP activity showed the emergence of early preparatory attention-directing components in parietal and frontal regions. Moreover, target-locked P1 components at occipito-parietal sites were significantly modulated by digit magnitude-target side congruency. These results demonstrate that irrelevant digit cues also bias sensory processing when embedded in a feature-discrimination task. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (0 UL)
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See detailThe SNARC effect – Does it depend on the level of mathematical training?
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Mussolin, Christophe; Schiltz, Christine UL

Scientific Conference (2012, February 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA developmental investigation of the SNARC effect using a colour discrimination task.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Mussolin, Christophe et al

Poster (2012)

How do number-space interactions develop from childhood to adulthood? The SNARC effect (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) reflects the finding that participants respond faster to small ... [more ▼]

How do number-space interactions develop from childhood to adulthood? The SNARC effect (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) reflects the finding that participants respond faster to small numbers with their left hand and to large numbers with their right hand during a number classification task. Typically assessed through magnitude-independent parity judgment tasks, the SNARC effect is thought to show the automaticity of the number-space link. Using a parity task on children Berch et al. (1999) found a SNARC effect no earlier than from 9.2 years onwards. However, we hypothesise that parity judgments might be inappropriate to assess younger children. Therefore a more age-appropriate colour judgment task (implicit) and a magnitude judgement task (explicit) were designed and tested on 363 children from kindergarten to Grade 6 (5.8-12 years). The experimental tasks were complemented by a brief assessment of arithmetic skills. The results revealed overall significant SNARC effects [colour task t(355)=2.6, p<0.01; magnitude task t(340)=4.7, p<0.001], which interacted with grade [colour task F(6,355)=2.18; p<0.05; magnitude task F(6,340)=2.09; p=0.05]. Most interestingly, even the kindergartners already display both effects [colour task t(28)=1.96; p<0.05; magnitude task t(24)=1.7; p=0.05]. These results show explicit and implicit access to numerical magnitude in children as young as 5.8 years. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (6 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: Electrophysiological evidence from a target discrimination task
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2011, April)

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects ... [more ▼]

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects as event-related potentials (ERPs) at centro-parietal sites. Since both studies used target detection tasks, it remains currently unknown whether similar results would be obtained with a discrimination task. We used ERPs to test whether digit cues also induce attention shifts when participants perform a feature-discrimination task on targets. ERPs were recorded whereas subjects discriminated the colour of lateral targets that were preceded by a central non-predictive digit. Analysis of cue-locked controlateral vs. ipsilateral ERP activity showed the emergence of early preparatory attention-directing components in parietal and frontal regions. Moreover, target-locked P1 components at occipito-parietal sites were significantly modulated by digit magnitude-target side congruency. These results demonstrate that irrelevant digit cues also bias sensory processing when embedded in a feature-discrimination task. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (3 UL)
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See detailWhen numbers act as attentional cues: behavioral and fMRI investigations
Goffaux, Valerie; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Poster (2011, February 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe SNARC effect – Does it depend on the level of mathematical training?
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Mussolin, Christophe; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2011)

Behavioural studies show a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). One instance of this link is the SNARC (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) effect, consisting in faster ... [more ▼]

Behavioural studies show a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). One instance of this link is the SNARC (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) effect, consisting in faster reaction times responding to small/large digits with the left/right hand respectively (Dehaene et al. 1993). The SNARC effect has often been replicated, but it is also characterized by high inter-subject variability (Wood et al. 2006a,b). Although differences in mathematical skills are an obvious candidate source for SNARC variability, this variable has not yet been explored systematically. While in their seminal study Dehaene and colleagues had included two groups of participants differing in their field of study (science vs. literature), the differences in SNARC effect strengths indicated by the result figures were not tested formally (see also Fischer and Rottmann (2005)). The present study aims to assess the influence of mathematical training, as instantiated by the enrollment in study fields characterized by distinct levels of mathematical requirements, on the SNARC effect. We only included students of either a subject with a strong mathematical focus (e.g. mathematics, computer sciences), or no mathematical requirements at all (e.g. literature, philosophy). Results (N=36; 18/group) yielded a significant overall SNARC effect, i.e. interaction between digit magnitude and response side [F(1,35)=9.51; p=0.004], but no influence of study group on this interaction [F(1,35)=0.92; p=0.345]. Interestingly though, including gender in the ANOVA yielded a significant four-way interaction [F(1,35)=6.34; p=0.017]. These results replicate previous findings in children (Schweiter et al. 2005), interpreted as gender-related differences in mental strategy use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 UL)
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See detailFacilitation and inhibition of return using numbers as attentional cues
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2011)

Behavioural studies have shown a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). Fischer and colleagues (2003) showed that digits can act as central spatial cues in a target detection task ... [more ▼]

Behavioural studies have shown a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). Fischer and colleagues (2003) showed that digits can act as central spatial cues in a target detection task, resulting in shorter reaction times (RT) for left-sided targets when preceded by small numbers and for right-sided targets when preceded by large numbers. This facilitation effect indicates that numbers orient visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield, depending on their magnitude. To date no studies investigated whether this facilitation is followed by inhibition of return at longer intervals, as could be expected with visuo-spatial attention shifts. To this aim, we designed an analogous paradigm to Fischer et al.’s, introducing additional longer intervals. Participants (n=22) were presented a task irrelevant digit (1,2 vs. 8,9) for 400ms and had to detect a brief (100ms) lateral target appearing after a variable interval (100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250ms). A 2x6 repeated measures ANOVA of mean RT, with congruency and interval as within-subject variables yielded a significant interaction (F(5,21)=2.59, p=0.03). As expected, targets were detected significantly faster when appearing in the congruent (small-left, large-right) hemifield after 250ms (t(21)=2.01, p=0.029) (cf. Fischer et al., 2003). At 1250ms interval, targets were detected significantly slower when they appeared in the congruent compared to the incongruent hemifield (t(21)=2.29, p=0.016). These findings provide the first evidence that digits not only produce facilitation effects at shorter intervals, but also induce inhibitory effects at longer intervals, confirming the visuo-spatial nature of the attention shifts associated with Arabic digits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFacilitation and inhibition of return using numbers as attentional cues
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2011)

Behavioural studies have shown a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). Fischer and colleagues (2003) showed that digits can act as central spatial cues in a target detection task ... [more ▼]

Behavioural studies have shown a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). Fischer and colleagues (2003) showed that digits can act as central spatial cues in a target detection task, resulting in shorter reaction times (RT) for left-sided targets when preceded by small numbers and for right-sided targets when preceded by large numbers. This facilitation effect indicates that numbers orient visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield, depending on their magnitude. To date no studies investigated whether this facilitation is followed by inhibition of return at longer intervals, as could be expected with visuo-spatial attention shifts. To this aim, we designed an analogous paradigm to Fischer et al.’s, introducing additional longer intervals. Participants (n=25) were presented a task irrelevant digit (1,2 vs. 8,9) for 400ms and had to detect a brief (100ms) lateral target appearing after a variable interval (100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250ms). A 2x6 repeated measures ANOVA of mean RT, with congruency and interval as within-subject variables yielded a significant interaction (F(5,24)=2.3, p<0.05). As expected, targets were detected faster when appearing in the congruent (small-left, large-right) hemifield after 250ms. Using the regression method proposed by Lorch and Myers (1990), the slope at this interval was significantly negative (t(24)=1.70, p=0.05); indicating a facilitation for the detection of targets in the congruent hemifield) (cf. Fischer et al., 2003). At the 1250ms interval, targets were detected significantly slower when they appeared in the congruent compared to the incongruent hemifield (yielding significantly positive slopes at 1250ms: t(24)=2.68, p=0.007). These findings provide the first evidence that digits not only produce facilitation effects at shorter intervals, but also induce inhibitory effects at longer intervals, confirming the visuo-spatial nature of the attention shifts associated with Arabic digits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeveloping number-space associations: SNARC effects in a color discrimination task in 11-year-olds
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Mussolin, Christophe et al

Poster (2011)

Behavioural studies show a relation between numbers and space in adults (DeHevia et al., 2008) and this association arises early in development (Opfer et al., 2010). The SNARC (Spatial Numerical ... [more ▼]

Behavioural studies show a relation between numbers and space in adults (DeHevia et al., 2008) and this association arises early in development (Opfer et al., 2010). The SNARC (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) effect consists in faster reaction times (RTs) responding to small/large digits with the left/right hand respectively (Dehaene et al. 1993). It is thought to reflect the automaticity of the number-space link, since it arises not only during explicit magnitude judgment tasks, but also during magnitude-independent parity judgment tasks. Using a parity task Berch et al. (1999) found a SNARC effect in children of 9.2 years onwards, but not in younger children (7.8 years). One major issue raised was that parity judgments might be too difficult and therefore problematic to test young children (VanGalen&Reitsma, 2008). Hence, we designed a color judgment instead of a parity judgment task and tested 33 children from Grade 6 (mean age 11.4 years, SD 0.6). We also assessed number magnitude access using a magnitude judgment task. The results revealed a significantly negative slope in the color task [t(32)=2.47, p<0.01] and in the magnitude task [t(33)=1.75, p<0.05], reflecting a SNARC effect in both tasks (regression method by Lorch&Myers, 1990). A correlation analysis of the slopes of both tasks revealed a positive relationship (r=0.33, p<0.05) indicating that they partly measure the same processes. These results confirm the presence of robust SNARC effects in 6th-graders and indicate that they occur even using a simple color discrimination task that is strictly independent of semantic number processing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (6 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhen small is left and large is right : Behavioural evidence for attentional shifts due to irrelevant numerical cues
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2010)

Numerous behavioural studies indicate the existence of a link between numerical representations and visuo-spatial processes (for review see DeHevia et al., 2008). A striking demonstration of this link was ... [more ▼]

Numerous behavioural studies indicate the existence of a link between numerical representations and visuo-spatial processes (for review see DeHevia et al., 2008). A striking demonstration of this link was provided by Fischer and colleagues (2003), who reported that participants detect a target faster in the left hemifield, if preceded by a small number (e.g. 2 or 3) and faster in the right hemifield if preceded by a large number (e.g. 8 or 9). This is strong evidence that numbers orient visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield, depending on their magnitude (e.g., small and large, respectively) (see also Galfano et al., 2006; Ristic et al., 2006). We designed a modified version of this target detection paradigm, by replacing the detection task with a target discrimination task (cf. Hommel et al., 2001). The participants (n=16) were presented 1 task irrelevant digit (1,2 vs. 8,9) for 400ms. After a variable inter-stimulus interval (500, 1000 or 2000ms), they had to discriminate the colour of a brief (100ms) lateral target. We hypothesized that the centrally presented numbers would induce an orientation of attention, in the same direction as the initial observations by Fischer et al. (2003). The current results indicate a significant effect, but only for the shortest digit-target interval (500ms). We observed a significant interaction between number magnitude (small/large) and side of target presentation (left/right) (F1,15 =7.784, p<0.014). These findings indicate that the attentional shifts induced by irrelevant numerical material are independent of the exact nature of target processing (discrimination vs. detection). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (2 UL)