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See detailTask instructions determine the visuo-spatial and verbal-spatial nature of number-space associations
Georges, Carrie UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL

Poster (2014, April)

Evidence for number-space associations comes from the spatial-numerical association of response-codes (SNARC) effect, consisting in faster reaction times (RTs) to small/large digits with the left/right ... [more ▼]

Evidence for number-space associations comes from the spatial-numerical association of response-codes (SNARC) effect, consisting in faster reaction times (RTs) to small/large digits with the left/right hand respectively. Classically, they are thought to result from numerical coding along a left-to-right-oriented mental number line (visuo-spatial account; Dehaene et al., 1993). Recently, an association between the verbal concepts “small”/“left” and “large”/“right” has been suggested as an alternative explanation (verbal-spatial account; Gevers et al., 2010). Since the predominance of these accounts remains debated, we aimed to determine whether task instructions influence their extent of explaining the SNARC effect. A magnitude comparison task where the verbal labels “left”/“right” were displayed on the left/right response side alternatively allowed us to directly contrast the two accounts by comparing verbal SNARC slopes (based on differences in RTs to the labels “left” and “right”) with classical spatial SNARC slopes (based on differences in RTs to the left and right response side). In the verbal condition, participants (41 students, 20 female, mean age=21.6) responded to the assigned labels irrespective of their side of appearance, whereas the spatial condition required responding to the left or right response side irrespective of the displayed label. Under verbal instructions, only the verbal slope was significantly negative (verbal slope=-67.54, spatial slope=-4.82). Conversely, no significant difference was observed between verbal and spatial slopes under spatial instructions – both slopes being significantly negative (verbal slope=-15.12, spatial slope=-29.39). Taken together, number-space associations arise from verbal coding regardless of task instructions, while spatial coding only occurs under spatial instructions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (21 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe SNARC effect and its relationship to spatial abilities in women
Georges, Carrie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2013)

A classical demonstration of number-space associations is the so-called SNARC (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) effect. It consists in faster reaction times to small/large digits with the ... [more ▼]

A classical demonstration of number-space associations is the so-called SNARC (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes) effect. It consists in faster reaction times to small/large digits with the left/right hand respectively. To get a better understanding of the well-documented inter-individual variability in the SNARC effect, we investigated the relationship between the classically used parity SNARC and spatial abilities, as indexed by visuo-spatial working memory capacity (WMC). The study population consisted of female university students (n=20; mean age=23.79; SD=2.50) recruited in the fields of humanities and educational sciences. Since systematic studies on the reliability of the SNARC effect are still lacking, we first measured the internal consistency, as assessed by split-half reliability, as well as test-retest reliability of the parity SNARC. Split-half and test-retest correlation coefficients were (r(19)=0.41; p<0.05) and (r(19)=0.25; p=0.14) respectively, indicating a trend towards consistency. In the present female population, a significant negative correlation was revealed between the strength of the parity SNARC effect (mean slope=-10.04; SD=8.66) and visuo-spatial WMC (mean WMC=2.85; SD=1.12; r(19)=-0.51; p<0.05). This finding thus indicates that number-space associations as measured by the parity SNARC effect tend to be stronger in young female adults with higher spatial abilities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 148 (14 UL)