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See detailFrom the Dustbin of History: Rethinking the History of Amateur Media in a Historical Conversation
Aasman, Susan; van der Heijden, Tim UL; Slootweg, Tom

Scientific Conference (2018, August 23)

“Amateurs of one era are not the amateurs of another, even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them”, is an intriguing statement made by Lisa Gitelman (2014). Overall, Gitelman’s answer would ... [more ▼]

“Amateurs of one era are not the amateurs of another, even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them”, is an intriguing statement made by Lisa Gitelman (2014). Overall, Gitelman’s answer would favor a certain level of complexity as to avoid ‘sloppy media history’ even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them (137). Rather, we should explore how amateur filmmakers ‘doing and its do-ability’ can differ as they are situated in broader historical contexts. Building on this idea of a complex and dynamic history, that consists of a diversity of histories, we propose to start a semi-structured conversation between three experts in amateur media and between the experts and the audience. We seek to follow traces that connect or disconnect the various discourses and practices in amateur media history in which amateurism encountered predictions, hopes, and tried out appropriations of amateur media technologies as an alternative/marginal media space. The set of related concepts that will be deployed through time and in relation to different historical contexts are: marginality, democratization, resistance, alternative, avant-garde, subversive and experimental. By comparing, contrasting and evaluating these set of concepts we hope to add to the overall goal of the conference to open up a space to rethink historiography. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (6 UL)
See detailMaterializing Memories. Dispositifs, Generations, Amateurs
Fickers, Andreas UL; Aasman, Susan; Wachelder, Joseph

Book published by Bloomsbury (2018)

A multitude of devices and technological tools now exist to make, share, and store memories and moments with family, friends, and even strangers. Memory practices such as home movies, which originated as ... [more ▼]

A multitude of devices and technological tools now exist to make, share, and store memories and moments with family, friends, and even strangers. Memory practices such as home movies, which originated as the privilege of a few, well-to-do families, have now emerged as ubiquitous and immediate cultures of sharing. Departing from the history of home movies, this volume offers a sophisticated understanding of technologically mediated, mostly ritualized memory practices, from early beginnings in the fin-de-siècle to today. Departing from a longue durée perspective on home movie practices, Materializing Memories moves beyond a strict historical study to grapple with highly theorized fields, such as media studies, memory studies, and science and technology studies (STS). The contributors to this volume reflect on these different intellectual backgrounds and perspectives, but all chapters share a common framework by addressing practices of use, user configurations, and relevant media landscapes. Grasping the cultural dynamics of such multi-faceted practices requires a multidimensional conceptual approach, here achieved by centering around three concepts as central analytical lenses: dispositifs, generations, and amateurs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (5 UL)
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See detailIntroduction
Fickers, Andreas UL; Aasman, Susan; Wachelder, Joseph

in Fickers, Andreas; Aasman, Susan; Wachelder, Joseph (Eds.) Materializing Memories. Dispositifs, Generations, Technologies (2018)

A multitude of devices and technological tools now exist to make, share, and store memories and moments with family, friends, and even strangers. Memory practices such as home movies, which originated as ... [more ▼]

A multitude of devices and technological tools now exist to make, share, and store memories and moments with family, friends, and even strangers. Memory practices such as home movies, which originated as the privilege of a few, well-to-do families, have now emerged as ubiquitous and immediate cultures of sharing. Departing from the history of home movies, this volume offers a sophisticated understanding of technologically mediated, mostly ritualized memory practices, from early beginnings in the fin-de-siècle to today. Departing from a longue durée perspective on home movie practices, Materializing Memories moves beyond a strict historical study to grapple with highly theorized fields, such as media studies, memory studies, and science and technology studies (STS). The contributors to this volume reflect on these different intellectual backgrounds and perspectives, but all chapters share a common framework by addressing practices of use, user configurations, and relevant media landscapes. Grasping the cultural dynamics of such multi-faceted practices requires a multidimensional conceptual approach, here achieved by centering around three concepts as central analytical lenses: dispositifs, generations, and amateurs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 UL)
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See detail'Hare Majesteit de Smalfilm' - De making of de vroege amateurfilm(er)
van der Heijden, Tim UL; Aasman, Susan

in Tijdschrift voor Mediageschiedenis (2014), 17(1), 7-26

This article reconstructs the world of the Dutch amateur film around 1930; a dynamic period during which the amateur film gradually developed from being just one branch of photography (cinematography) to ... [more ▼]

This article reconstructs the world of the Dutch amateur film around 1930; a dynamic period during which the amateur film gradually developed from being just one branch of photography (cinematography) to becoming an independent film discipline. On the basis of a series of articles about amateur film, published in the photography magazine 'Focus', we shed light on the changing creative processes and discourses of early amateur films and by extension the ‘making of’ early amateur filmmakers themselves. The series, which was written by a beginning amateur filmmaker on the threshold of the ‘Nederlandse Smalfilmliga’ [Dutch Amateur Film League] (1931) and the amateur film magazine 'Het Veerwerk' (1932), offers an interesting insider view of the world of amateur films as it is taking shape. Taking the themes that are covered in the series – ranging from simple films of children and holidays to editing – and the associated user dynamics, the article throws light on the amateur filmmakers’ quest for a distinct production culture and way of creating films. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 UL)